Monday, December 30, 2013

10 Ways Food Fix Will Help You Keep Your New Year's Resolutions


In preparation for the New Year and the resolutions that you will make regarding health and wellness, we are including a guest blog this week from Susan Lebel Young, author of Food Fix: Ancient Nourishment for Modern Hungers. If you’ve found yourself making the same resolutions year after year and still not accomplishing your lifestyle and health goals, here are ten ways Food Fix will help you with your New Year’s resolutions.

1. Self-compassion is a motivator for change and Food Fix is full of reminders about self-compassion. Studies show that athletic performance, business productivity, weight loss and personal growth intentions are helped more with caring self-talk than with judgments. At the end of every chapter, Food Fix offers antidotes to self-criticism by inviting readers into a deep connection with their innate abilities to move forward with their resolutions with great kindness. Each chapter gives practice in strengthening what is already in us.

2. Fruits and vegetables increase our well-being on all levels. Food Fix has practical exercises in every chapter to help readers increase these vital foods in everyday life. As their intake increases, so does our feeling better. All current nutritional research agrees that a diet loaded with fruits and vegetables leads to great health and happiness. Popular diet books disagree on whether or not meat is good or dairy is bad, but all tout the benefits of a wide range of colorful produce to fill us up, and to give our bodies the antioxidants and phytonutrients we need. 

3. As Socrates said, “Know Thyself.”  To heal old repetitive habits, the first step is awareness. Only with self-knowledge can we integrate, change or heal what we want to transform. Each chapter of Food Fix offers inquiry questions to help readers get really clear about their histories, patterns and preferences.

4. You will see that you are not alone. What I call food frenzy is epidemic in this culture. I wrote memoir pieces for every chapter of Food Fix to help you know that there are others who suffer with what is rampant in this society. Just like you, millions struggle with issues of food, body and weight. Since studies in neuroscience prove that we are wired as social animals, loneliness itself can lead to more suffering. Reading Food Fix will lessen your sense of isolation.

5. Your struggles are not your fault.  Food Fix will help you see that we are all up against the billions of dollars spent by the meat, dairy, and sugar lobbies to get us to eat more and more of the addictive substances of fat, salt and sugar. Food Fix is meant as a guide to help you see clearly the “pushers” from agribusiness and empower you to make your own individual healthy choices.

6. Food Fix gives on-going modern-day motivation. New Year’s Resolutions tend to run out of steam after a few days or weeks. Pick up Food Fix any day of the year, open to any page and read whatever you find for on-going support. See how modern-day real people navigate through the question of “how do we best live in a human body?”

7. Food Fix offers daily inspiration from the ancients.  On most pages, readers will find quotes from wise and compassionate ancient sources; mystics, poets, writers, spiritual traditions and leaders. Some seem to have nothing to do with food. Yet how we do one thing is often how we do all things. Advice about life from centuries ago can help inform how we think and feel about our bodies and lives today.

8. Food Fix asks us to increase our time and attention to our resolutions, gradually and with ease.  Since the energy and focus for long-term change is difficult to sustain, a New Year’s Resolution can be like a flash in the pan. The intention underlying Food Fix is to help readers extend their self-commitments over time, to maintain long-term recovery from food frenzy, to return to that place of peace over and over again when and if we lose it. Every chapter offers practice.

9. Studies show that journaling, writing, jotting down feelings can help us heal.  Each chapter of Food Fix offers invitations to record experiences as you journey through change. Human beings tend not to remember what we go through. It is our nature to forget. When we document how we feel, we have a way to look back every now and then. Food Fix gives you that opportunity.

10. You will journey from the emptiness of the not-real (as pictured by the junk on the cover) to the fullness and vitality of the real (as shown by the apples on the back). Resolutions can not be made once and for all. They need to be made moment-to-moment. Food Fix gives you the opportunity to flip pages over and over, all year long, thereby increasing your chance of success.

About the author
Susan Lebel Young MSED, MSC, author of Lessons From A Golfer: A Daughter’s Story of Opening the Heart, is a perfect guide on your journey toward heartfulness in your food and life. Young is a self-professed junk food junkie who has maintained a fifty pound weight loss and a change of food-frenzy mentality for thirty years using these food fix antidotes. She has Masters degrees in both Education and Counseling. She has studied and taught mindfulness in Maine, South Carolina and at the Center for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Young has helped clients in her private psychotherapy practice since 1995 and taught yoga since 2000. She has led mindfulness workshops, taught mindful eating, and taught courses that she developed in mind-body approaches to counseling and spirituality in the counseling process to Master’s level counseling students. Young studied plant-based nutrition with The China Study author T. Colin Campbell’s e-Cornell courses. She writes monthly for the “Reflections” column in the Portland Press Herald. Young is a very proud grandmother, mother of two adult children, and lives with her husband Jon in Falmouth, Maine.


Nancy E. Randolph operates Just Write Books, a publishing business with the tag line: Maine books by Maine authors telling Maine stories. Randolph quickly developed a reputation as a publisher of quality Maine books. An active community member along with two others she founded and serves as a member of the board of Save Our Swinging Bridge.Org to ensure the maintenance of the historic Roebling designed and built bridge connecting Topsham and Brunswick. She co-chairs with Cathy Lamb the Androscoggin Brunswick-Topsham Riverwalk project--building a 2K walking/biking intown loop. To contact her directly: jstwrite@jstwrite.com

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

10 Reasons to Buy and Read Islands of Time

Book Synopsis
At fourteen, Rebecca Granger falls in love with Ben Bunker. A summer girl is not allowed to love a year-round boy, son of a fisherman in Downeast Maine in 1958. Yet, she does. When her father dies—overpowered by loss and anger—she commits a sin, terrible at the time. That sin nearly destroys Rebecca. She hides in fantasies until as an adult, returning to Maine she struggles to come to terms with that past. Islands of Time is a moving story of loss, pain and growth, but also of unexpected forgiveness and love that celebrates the people and places of Downeast Maine.




10 Reasons to Buy and Read Islands of Time

1. Bestselling Maine author, Linda Greenlaw, says, “I really like it” and we think you and your friends and family will too.


2. If you don’t live in Maine, it’s a cheap way to visit.

3. If you do live in Maine, Islands will remind you why and you can give it to friends and family who aren’t as smart or lucky as you are.

4. The author will send you a signed bookmark.
 

5. The cover is beautiful. Judge this book by its cover.

6. The story is compelling, well-written, and you will love the characters of Becky and Ben. We’re not the only ones who think thatlots of reviewers and readers have said the same thing.

7. Islands of Time will warm your heart, which is a good strategy for warming the rest of you on a cold winter day.
OR Curling up with this good book on a cold day is a great way to keep warm.
 

8. You’ll encourage the author to write a sequel.

9. There is a lot to learn about Maine, its history, people, beauty, and culture in Islands of Time and more to learn about love, forgiveness, and finding ourselves.

10. It’s a good read.

Author Bio
In 1948, Barbara Kent Lawrence fell in love with Mount Desert Island as a summer kid, and in 1979 she became a “year-round summer person,” a status more compelling and complex than she could then have imagined. In 1998 she wrote her dissertation: Working Memory: The Influence of Culture on Aspirations about the gap between the high rate of achievement Maine’s fourth grade students evidenced on national tests, and the low rate at which they went on to college. Lawrence has since written books about education and eating disorders in men and she’s working on a manuscript about her British family during World War II. She draws on her love of Maine and her experience as a researcher and writer for her this novel Islands of Time. Though Lawrence no longer lives in Maine year-round, she spends as much time as possible on Mount Desert Island.

Nancy E. Randolph operates Just Write Books, a publishing business with the tag line: Maine books by Maine authors telling Maine stories. Randolph quickly developed a reputation as a publisher of quality Maine books. An active community member along with two others she founded and serves as a member of the board of Save Our Swinging Bridge.Org to ensure the maintenance of the historic Roebling designed and built bridge connecting Topsham and Brunswick. She co-chairs with Cathy Lamb the Androscoggin Brunswick-Topsham Riverwalk project--building a 2K walking/biking intown loop. To contact her directly: jstwrite@jstwrite.com

Monday, December 9, 2013

10 Books that Influenced my Life



The Times Record publisher, Larry Hubner asked me to participate in a full-page special highlighting the six most influential books in the lives of booksellers. I wrote the first six below for that piece and then added four so that I could stick with my theme of ten on my blog.

1. Psychocybernetics by Maxwell Maltz.(nonfiction) I learned that I, like other people, saw myself inaccurately. My perceptions were distorted by erroneous beliefs imbedded in my subconscious mind by my living in a hellacious household of abuse and poverty. I learned to "re-program" my mind to do and see what could be. That has served me well throughout my life.

2. The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran a book of 26 prose poetry essays written in English by a Lebanese writer (and philosopher and artist). Before the death of my first husband in 1997, I read many of these poems aloud to George as the cancer affected his eyesight before his death. Gibran's poem "On Death" helped me watch George live at the end rather than watch my best friend die. "And when the earth shall claim your limbs, then shall you truly dance."

3. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. In this novel ‎about a motorcycle road trip, Robert M. Pirsig explores the question of how to live with technology without allowing it to degrade our life. Since I work many hours a day with computers, it has been key for me to be the techno-nerd with the ability to fix my own "motorcycle" on my "daily ride." Working with technology yet not allowing the technology to take over my art and my connection with society has been a key lesson of what I received from my reading of ZAMM.

4. 1984 by George Orwell. This piece of fiction emphasizes a world in which conformity is rewarded, introduced the warning, "Big Brother is watching you" and fashioned the term Newspeak--creating words helping the government control its people. 1984 inspired me to write a journal. My journaling has continued over the years--if sporadically. 

5. Wherever You Go, There You Are: Mindfulness Meditation in Everyday Life by Jon Kabat Zinn. (nonfiction) This book deepened my understanding of mindfulness. I have lived a life that some people would say is exciting. Sometimes I have been very stressed to do what I have chosen to do in my life. Mindfulness helps me stay connected to the present and what matters.

6. Emotional Intelligence (nonfiction) by Daniel Goleman. Goleman gave ink to my innate belief that there was more than IQ determining a child's ability to survive and even thrive in environments of poverty and despair. The five elements of emotional intelligence are self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill. These, then, determine our success. They can be learned and improved. I was lucky, I didn't settle for what I was born into.

7. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (novella). An allegorical tale about a little prince traveling from his home planet, fallen to earth and the lessons the narrator learns. I loved reading this when my children were small. I think I might have read it more to myself than to my two daughters.

8. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie (nonfiction). Before enlisting in the Navy when I ran out of money going to college, I interviewed for a job teaching the Dale Carnegie course. The person who interviewed me gave me a set of three of Carnegie's books. I read all, but I remember much about HTWF&IF. This has helped me over the years when dealing with family, friends and others.

9. Courage to Heal: A Guide for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse by Ellen Bass and Laura Davis (nonfiction). This book provided clear information to me when I finally decided to deal with the wounds of my childhood.  It offered hope and a clear guide for my healing.

10. Wild Plants of Maine by Tom Seymour. This book taught me that I can sell books and help my authors make money. Tom Seymour is able to sell books himself and the publicity surrounding events that we put on help Tom book edible plant walks and presentations adding to his income. This book also brought Tom Seymour into my life and we have become family in addition to publisher/author.


Nancy E. Randolph operates Just Write Books, a publishing business with the tag line: Maine books by Maine authors telling Maine stories. Randolph quickly developed a reputation as a publisher of quality Maine books. An active community member along with two others she founded and serves as a member of the board of Save Our Swinging Bridge.Org to ensure the maintenance of the historic Roebling designed and built bridge connecting Topsham and Brunswick. She co-chairs with Cathy Lamb the Androscoggin Brunswick-Topsham Riverwalk project--building a 2K walking/biking intown loop. To contact her directly: jstwrite@jstwrite.com

Sunday, December 1, 2013

10 Great Just Write Books to Give as Christmas Gifts

Here are ten books, new and old, that make excellent gifts for the readers on your shopping list. This selection shows the breadth of books published by Just Write Books. There’s something for everyone.

Wild Plants of Maine: A Useful Guide by Tom Seymour
In this edition of Wild Plants of Maine, Tom Seymour has added several new wild plants, more mushrooms and  some exciting new recipes to the bountiful harvest that Tom Seymour leads us to discover in Maine. From insect repellent to table fare to a relaxing wintergreen tea, Seymour identifies the source and describes the method of preparing wild plant concoctions and foods. Any person living in or visiting Maine should have Wild Plants of Maine to ensure the enjoyment of our great Maine outdoors. From the shore to the forest and from the first green of spring to the snowiest winter day, join the “best guide of all” as Seymour enjoys Maine “wilds.”

A Daughter of Francis Martin by Virginia Chute
This historical novel is deftly written keeping to historical facts and filling in with an imagination and a sharp pen that allows us to follow Virginia Chute on her travels back in time.

I'm Just a Kid You Know by Norma K. Salway
Teachers and parents will enjoy "sitting in the classroom with Norma Salway." Salway tells tales from school-familiar to most veteran teachers. New teachers will enjoy and learn from the stories, parents will gain an understanding of their children's school experience and others will sense and appreciate the school atmosphere in the 21st century. Salway brings her three decades of teaching to her stories. 



Islands of Time by Barbara Kent Lawrence
At fourteen, Rebecca Granger falls in love with Ben Bunker. A summer girl is not allowed to love a year-round boy, son of a fisherman in Downeast Maine in 1958. Yet, she does. When her father dies—overpowered by loss and anger—she commits a sin, terrible at the time. That sin nearly destroys Rebecca. She hides in fantasies until as an adult, returning to Maine she struggles to come to terms with that past. Islands of Time is a moving story of loss, pain and growth, but also of unexpected forgiveness and love that celebrates the people and places of Downeast Maine.

Man in the Canal by Paul Betit (forthcoming)
In the summer of 1971, Army CID investigator John Murphy goes undercover to find a murderer hiding among the U.S. military deserters who have taken refuge in Sweden during the Vietnam War.  At the same time, Swedish police inspector Magnus Lund tries to learn the identity of a body found floating in the historic Göta Canal. The two investigators work independently until the thread of clues bring them together for an exciting climax.

Coming Home: A Maine Mystery by Robert M. Chute
Get caught up in the lives of a small Maine town as a soldier returns home from war. When Jim Johnston returns home and discovers a body in the guest house, he feels compelled to follow the clues of a past romance and mob connections.

Lewis and the Lighthouse by Bill McKibben
Bill McKibben has written his first book about Lewis, a boy who lives on the coast of Maine near a lighthouse. Enjoy the tale of Lewis' exciting adventure as he races to save a ship one stormy night. With just enough suspense for young readers, this fun read-aloud book is illustrated with lively art by Robert Logan.

Maney the Moose by Roland Wallace
Maney is a Maine moose with a sneezing problem. Maney finds friends who are tolerant of his problem and find a way to help him. The black and white drawings are sure to fascinate both children and adult readers.

Lovewell's Town by Robert Williams
Visit Lovell, Maine and travel in time through the years! Dr. Robert C. Williams has retired to Lovell, Maine, and taken the opportunity to use his educational background combined with his love of history and finely honed writing skills to produce this first professional history of the town of Lovell. Read this book and follow the settlement from the survey of the Merrimack River in 1652 through the famous battle at Pequawket in 1725 to the current struggle between the forces of development and preservation. Williams haunted local archives, as well as state archive collections of Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire to produce this comprehensive history of Lovell, Maine. The writing is enlivened by current and historical photos and illustrations. For the historical researcher Williams has added a very thorough index.

Food Fix: Ancient Nourishment for Modern Hungers by Susan Lebel Young
Have you tried dozens of diets and still find yourself craving junk food, fatty treats and low-value foods? Do you plan each night to do better with your food tomorrow and feel you failed again? Do you fill your shelves and your body with foods that have little or no nutritional value? Do you expend all this effort and still starve for something more? If these questions resonate with you or someone your love; this book will help. It is not a diet book. It is a book of skill building. Susan Lebel Young offers a series of stories about her life, lessons she has learned. Then she shares with you what she calls Antidotes to Food Frenzy. Susan walks you through exercises—starting small with a minimal investment of time, increasing your work as you raise your level of success.

This is just a sampling of the books available from Just Write Books. What is your favorite?

Nancy E. Randolph operates Just Write Books, a publishing business with the tag line: Maine books by Maine authors telling Maine stories. Randolph quickly developed a reputation as a publisher of quality Maine books. An active community member along with two others she founded and serves as a member of the board of Save Our Swinging Bridge.Org to ensure the maintenance of the historic Roebling designed and built bridge connecting Topsham and Brunswick. She co-chairs with Cathy Lamb the Androscoggin Brunswick-Topsham Riverwalk project--building a 2K walking/biking intown loop. To contact her directly: jstwrite@jstwrite.com